Canada Ottawa River poised to peak amid flooding in Ontario, Quebec, New Brunswick

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Canada Ottawa River poised to peak amid flooding in Ontario, Quebec, New Brunswick

Heavy rainfall warnings, special weather statements issued for flood zones

 
Canadian Forces members build a wall of sandbags to protect a home in the Ottawa community of Constance Bay Tuesday. (Justin Tang/Canadian Press)
Severe spring flooding that has forced thousands of residents from their homes in Canada's eastern half refuses to let up in Ontario, Quebec and New Brunswick. Environment Canada has issued heavy rainfall warnings and special weather statements — with a mess of rain, sleet, snow and ice pellets possible across a wide section of the flood zones starting Tuesday night and continuing Wednesday. Defense Minister Harjit Sajjan said at a news conference in Ottawa Tuesday that there are now 2,600 Canadian Forces personnel deployed across the three provinces, with more on standby. He said about 1,000 of those are in Quebec.  Another 1,500 have been authorized to be sent to Ontario to help with historic flooding along the Ottawa River and in central Ontario cottage country towns like Bracebridge and MuskokaLakes. 
Frank Carrier raises a Canadian flag in his flooded backyard in Clarence-Rockland, east of Ottawa, Tuesday. (Albert Leung/CBC News)
Annual flooding in the Kashechewan First Nation in northern Ontario remains a concern. Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale said the vast majority of the 1,600 evacuations in Ontario are from that region, with the remainder mostly from the Ottawa area.  While many in these areas have been deploying sandbags to help cope with the flooding, researchers and consultants say they aren't necessarily the best solution. They say the sacks can be effective in flash floods or other situations where they won't be in contact with water for too long, but sandbags lose their effectiveness as soon as they become saturated with water, meaning they have limited impact during prolonged floods. Here are the latest developments in each affected region.

Ottawa

The Ottawa River should start to peak in some areas west of Ottawa-Gatineau on Tuesday, according to the Ottawa River Regulation Planning Board, which measures its water levels. Some communities along the Ottawa River are already seeing waters higher than they saw in the 2017 flood.
 
Flooded streets are seen in Sainte-Marthe-sur-le-Lac, Que. Tuesday. (Paul Chiasson/Canadian Press)
An estimated one million sandbags are standing between the Ottawa River and residences and businesses in Ottawa, and more are in place across the river in Gatineau, Que. But they may not be up to the task of holding back the water, which is expected to rise another 50 centimetres and not peak until later Tuesday or Wednesday. Municipal officials in Ottawa don't expect to be near cleanup mode until the Victoria Day long weekend. Watch aerial footage of the flooded Ottawa River:
CBC News
Drone footage shows Ottawa River flooding
 
CBC News captured aerial footage of the effects of recent flooding in Gatineau, Que. 1:52
Goodale also flagged another source of concern.  "The water level now in Lake Ontario is just to about its maximum normal run off," he said. "All of that obviously has to flow east. Combining with the flow coming down the Ottawa [River], that presents significant potential issues in relation to Montreal and places further downstream."   The weather could also make things difficult for those working to shore up properties against the floodwaters on Wednesday. Ottawa-Gatineau and areas to the west as far as Algonquin Park on the Ontario side of the river are expected to get two to five centimeters of snow, mixed with ice pellets, then 15 to 25 mm of rain. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said on Tuesday these extreme weather events will happen more often, and the government is fighting climate change and investing in climate-resilient infrastructure. The Insurance Bureau of Canada predicts the record flooding will push losses for homeowners from extreme weather to more than $1 billion this year. Finance Minister Bill Morneau said in light of record flooding this spring, the federal government is talking with the provinces about investments in disaster mitigation and prevention efforts. Increasingly, communities are looking at relocating people living in high-risk areas instead of paying year after year to help them rebuild.

Quebec

Some people will be able to return to their homes in Sainte-Marthe-sur-le-Lac, Que., on Tuesday afternoon after floodwaters breached a dike Saturday and forced about 6,000 to flee. The evacuation order will be lifted in certain areas of the town located northwest of Montreal, and Mayor Sonia Paulus said residents from "these areas will need to present identification and receive clearance before returning home." The order won't include a section of Sainte-Marthe that remains submerged. One resident kayaked through her home and shared emotional video:
This video of Valérie Deslauriers kayaking through her flooded home was posted on Facebook.
 
Deslauriers lives in Sainte-Marthe-sur-le-Lac, Que. A natural dike holding back the Lake of Two Mountains was breached this weekend. 0:19
The island of Montreal and Laval remain in states of emergency, a measure giving authorities the power to seize property and force evacuations, while officials in Quebec say the data available suggests the risk of flooding on several rivers across the province remains high. An additional 34 local states of emergency are still in effect around the province.  The province reported over 6,400 flooded homes, a further 3,500 surrounded by water and more than 10,000 evacuees — most of them from Sainte-Marthe-sur-le-Lac.
  • Royal Canadian Navy and Task Force Montreal personnel patrol an area of flooding to look for those in need of help or evacuation in Sainte-Marthe-sur-le-Lac, Que., on April 29, 2019. Thousands of people across Quebec, Ontario and New Brunswick are facing several more days of flooding. (Cplc Julie Turcotte/34th Brigage Group/2nd Canadian Division/Reuters)
New Brunswick
The St. John River from Fredericton to Saint John is still above flooding levels, but emergency officials said the river system is expected to recede to near or below flood stage before the week ends. The entire river basin is steadily declining, according to Greg MacCallum, director of the New Brunswick Emergency Measures Organization (EMO). EMO is now turning its focus to cleanup measures. Residents, however, are warned to avoid contact with floodwater, which can contain sewage and other waste. The Trans-Canada Highway remains closed between Oromocto and River Glade, N.B., but the province's Department of Transportation and Infrastructure said it could reopen this week. This is the second year in a row the major highway has closed due to flooding. Despite the turn in events, strong winds in the forecast remain a concern. New Brunswick power crews have been inspecting downed lines:
CBC News
Chunks of ice have knocked down a series of power poles
 
NB Power linemen, moving between locations on a small boat, were conducting checks on affected buildings and disconnecting power where needed. 1:00
Sajjan visited the Saint John area yesterday to view the activities of military personnel helping in the response effort. He says if the impact of climate change disasters continues to worsen, he may have to increase the number of Canadian Forces personnel available. Goodale said 9,200 residences and cottages have been affected by the flooding in New Brunswick, along with another 7,000 buildings. 

Kashechewan First Nation

First Nations leaders called on the Ontario and federal governments Monday to help relocate the community of Kashechewan as it deals with annual flooding — a problem one said would have already been solved if it involved a non-Indigenous population. Community members rallied on Parliament Hill on Tuesday.
Embedded video
Olivia Stefanovich@CBCOlivia
 

While eastern Canada battles rising flood waters, evacuees of Kashechewan are on Parliament Hill demanding the federal government honours a commitment it made 2 years ago to relocate the northern Ontario First Nation to higher, drier ground @CBCAlerts @CBCNews

The northern Ontario community of 2,500 first flooded in 1976 and has been evacuated annually for the past several years while it waits for the federal government to fulfil its promises to move residents to a permanent new location. "Both levels of government — Ontario and Canada — has allowed this to be normalized," said Nishnawbe Aski Nation Deputy Grand Chief Derek Fox. "I believe personally that if these were non-native, non-First Nations people, action would have happened a lot sooner. I sincerely believe that."
 

Central Ontario cottage country

The mayor of Bracebridge said he's hoping tomorrow's weather forecast doesn't play out as expected. Environment Canada issued a rainfall warning for the swath of central Ontario that's been struggling to cope with flooding in recent days. Mayor Graydon Smith said 25 to 30 mm could fall on Bracebridge tomorrow, with the possibility of a little more rain on Thursday. Smith says an additional 60 military personnel are coming to the region today to help with flood conditions, making a total of 160 soldiers in the area. Four municipalities have declared states of emergency in central Ontario, while further east the Ontario government has activated disaster recovery assistance for the county of Renfrew and the city of Pembroke.
 
A home on Beaumont Farm Road in Bracebridge, Ont., where many homes have been flooded, sinks into the ground after falling from its pilings. (Patrick Morrell/CBC)
With files from The Canadian Press
 
Source: CBC

JESUS Film in Amharic Language (የክርስቶስ ፊልም በአማርኛ)

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JESUS Film in Amharic Language (የክርስቶስ ፊልም በአማርኛ)


የእስክንድር ነጋ ስሕተት፤ እውነት የጎደለው የምሁራኑ ደብዳቤ እና “የጋዜጠኞች” የአድማ ፖለቲካ፤/ ከጥበበ ሳሙኤል ፈረንጅ፤ ሚያዚያ 14 ቀን 2011 04/22/2019

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የእስክንድር ነጋ ስሕተት፤ እውነት የጎደለው የምሁራኑ ደብዳቤ እና “የጋዜጠኞች” የአድማ ፖለቲካ፤/      ከጥበበ ሳሙኤል ፈረንጅ፤ ሚያዚያ 14 ቀን 2011 04/22/2019

አቶ ጥበበ ሳሙኤል  የመጨረሻው ክፍል። “It’s a familiar story to what we’ve seen in other countries undergoing a rapid and messy democratization, and it will require a massive effort to ensure that high-quality journalism and civic dialogue prevails without compromising freedom of expression,” said Nicholas Benequista of the Washington-based Center for.....

TZTA April 2019

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Sudan’s army removes President Bashir after 30 years in power

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Sudan's army removes President Bashir after 30 years in power

President arrested after months of protests that escalated with mass sit-in on Saturday

Military support for Omar al-Bashir appeared to be falling away in recent days as soldiers protected demonstrators.
 Military support for Omar al-Bashir appeared to be falling away in recent days as soldiers protected demonstrators. Photograph: Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah/Reuters
Sudan’s army has removed President Omar al-Bashir from power after 30 years, following months of protests that escalated at the weekend when demonstrators began a sit-in outside the defence ministry compound in central Khartoum. Bashir had been arrested “in a safe place”, the Sudanese defence minster and army general Ahmed Awad Ibn Auf said in a statement broadcast on state media. A military council will take control of the country for two years, after which elections would be held, Ibn Auf added. “For a long time, examining what’s going on in the state and the corruption that is going on,” he said. “The poor are poorer and the rich are still rich and there are no equal chances for the same people.” The military seized control of state television shortly after dawn on Thursday, amid unconfirmed reports that Bashir was under house arrest at his residence in the defence ministry compound. There were also reports that several senior figures close to Bashir in the ruling National Congress party had been detained.
Demonstrators in Khartoum celebrate Bashir’s departure on Thursday.
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 Demonstrators in Khartoum celebrate Bashir’s departure on Thursday. Photograph: STRINGER/Reuters
Ibn Auf said political detainees would be released but that a state of emergency would continue for three months and that a curfew from 10pm to 4am would be enforced for at least a month. All ports will remain closed for 24 hours. Sudan, one of Africa’s biggest and most strategically important countries, has been paralysed by months of protests that erupted on 19 December in the eastern city of Atbara after a government decision to triple the price of bread, but quickly evolved into nationwide demonstrations against Bashir’s rule. Though the removal from power of Bashir was welcomed with joy by protesters, the army’s decision to impose a curfew is a direct challenge to the thousands who have occupied a crossroads in the centre of Khartoum for five days. It is currently unclear how demonstrators will react, raising fears of bloodshed if they refuse to disperse. Attempts by security forces to break up the Khartoum sit-in have already killed at least 22 – including five soldiers, who organisers said were defending the protesters – and injured more than 150. The army has won considerable goodwill among protesters by protecting them from security services and pro-Bashir militia in recent days. Earlier this week, opposition leaders called for the military to step in to form a transitional government.
Sudanese protesters flash the victory sign as they march towards the military headquarters.
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 Sudanese protesters flash the victory sign as they march towards the military headquarters. Photograph: -/AFP/Getty Images
“Sudanese always believe that transition should come through the military. All are mindful of what instability could cause. Any chaos could have a very high cost,” said Saif al Din Abdelrahman, a Sudanese economist and expert based in Kenya. Shortly after dawn on Thursday Sudan state television had trailed “an important announcement” without giving further details. As anticipation built, state television and radio played patriotic music, reminding older Sudanese of how past military takeovers unfolded in the country, and images of recent protests. Despite a lack of concrete information about what was happening for much of the morning, tens of thousands of Sudanese marched through the centre of Khartoum in jubilation, dancing and chanting anti-Bashir slogans. Protesters outside the defence ministry chanted: “It has fallen, we won.”
There were sporadic protests elsewhere in the country, and some reports of shooting by security services. Footage posted to social media showed people tearing down posters depicting the president in Khartoum and marching on prisons and police stations.
Embedded video
Isma'il Kushkush@ikushkush
 

Sudanese protesters taking down images of Omar al-Bashir in Khartoum,

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Bashir is a former paratrooper who seized power in a bloodless coup in 1989 and has managed his way through one internal crisis after another while withstanding attempts by the west to weaken him.
The 75-year-old faces genocide charges at the international criminal court relating to extensive human rights abuses perpetrated by Sudanese forces against civilians in Darfur, the western region gripped by conflict since 2003 when rebels took up arms against the government, accusing it of discrimination and neglect. The UN says 300,000 people have died in the conflict and 2.7 million have fled their homes. However, many other leaders and governments in Africa have defended Bashir. In October 2017, the US eased sanctions against Sudan, citing improved humanitarian access, the mitigation of conflicts within the country and progress on counter-terrorism. Human rights organisations condemned the move. Ibn Auf is a controversial figure himself, blacklisted by Washington for his role as the army’s head of military intelligence and security during the Darfur conflict. He has been defence minister since 2015 and was promoted in February by Bashir to the role of first-vice president.

Can Abiy Ahmed build on a lightning start leading Ethiopia?

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Can Abiy Ahmed build on a lightning start leading Ethiopia?

Prime minister has won plaudits for reforms during his first year in office but faces challenge of long-running ethnic tensions. https://youtu.be/GE96dPv7aTw On Wednesday, April 10 at 19:30 GMT: Abiy Ahmed has led Ethiopia at a breathless pace since becoming prime minister a year ago this month, winning praise for tackling a host of internal and regional problems. But as the initial goodwill towards his ascent to the premiership recedes he faces a set of tough challenges that may yet complicate his flourishing reputation. When Ethiopia's ruling Ethiopian People's Revolutionary Democratic Front (EPRDF) elected Abiy he became the country's first ethnic Oromo prime minister since the EPRDF came to power in 1991. He pledged to heal divisions following deadly protests in the Oromia and Amhara regions that precipitated the resignation of his predecessor Hailemariam Desalegn - and within weeks lifted martial law imposed under a state of emergency. He went on to release hundreds of political prisoners and all imprisoned journalists, signed a peace deal with neighbouring Eritrea and began work on economic reforms aimed at boosting prospects for under-developed parts of the country. But deep-seated ethnic divisions fester. More than two million people are displaced, largely due to the impact or threat of ethnic violence. Tensions have been exacerbated by the impact of a prolonged drought. Abiy's plan to boost national inclusivity among dozens of ethnic communities has been undermined by demands from several groups that new federal states be formed. The continuing instability and spectre of Balkanisation has had a knock-on effect on civil cohesion and economic development. As Abiy enters his second year in charge we'll look at his successes and mis-steps, as well as the continuing disputes and dilemmas he must safely negotiate. Join the conversation. Read more: Abiy's year one: Ethiopia faces the threat of ethnic conflict - Al Jazeera Abiy's year one: Ethiopia's best hope for stability - Al Jazeera What do you think? Record a video comment or leave your thoughts in the comments below.
 

Ethiopian Airlines crew followed Boeing rules, preliminary crash report says

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Ethiopian Airlines crew followed Boeing rules, preliminary crash report says

18 Canadians among 157 killed when the Boeing 737 Max 8 crashed The Associated Press · Posted: Apr 04, 2019 4:39 AM ET | Last Updated: an hour ago   A man hired to assist forensic investigators looking into the March 10 Ethiopian Airlines crash walks by a pile of twisted airplane debris at Hama.....