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Canada Ottawa River poised to peak amid flooding in Ontario, Quebec, New Brunswick

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Canada Ottawa River poised to peak amid flooding in Ontario, Quebec, New Brunswick

Heavy rainfall warnings, special weather statements issued for flood zones

 
Canadian Forces members build a wall of sandbags to protect a home in the Ottawa community of Constance Bay Tuesday. (Justin Tang/Canadian Press)
Severe spring flooding that has forced thousands of residents from their homes in Canada's eastern half refuses to let up in Ontario, Quebec and New Brunswick. Environment Canada has issued heavy rainfall warnings and special weather statements — with a mess of rain, sleet, snow and ice pellets possible across a wide section of the flood zones starting Tuesday night and continuing Wednesday. Defense Minister Harjit Sajjan said at a news conference in Ottawa Tuesday that there are now 2,600 Canadian Forces personnel deployed across the three provinces, with more on standby. He said about 1,000 of those are in Quebec.  Another 1,500 have been authorized to be sent to Ontario to help with historic flooding along the Ottawa River and in central Ontario cottage country towns like Bracebridge and MuskokaLakes. 
Frank Carrier raises a Canadian flag in his flooded backyard in Clarence-Rockland, east of Ottawa, Tuesday. (Albert Leung/CBC News)
Annual flooding in the Kashechewan First Nation in northern Ontario remains a concern. Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale said the vast majority of the 1,600 evacuations in Ontario are from that region, with the remainder mostly from the Ottawa area.  While many in these areas have been deploying sandbags to help cope with the flooding, researchers and consultants say they aren't necessarily the best solution. They say the sacks can be effective in flash floods or other situations where they won't be in contact with water for too long, but sandbags lose their effectiveness as soon as they become saturated with water, meaning they have limited impact during prolonged floods. Here are the latest developments in each affected region.

Ottawa

The Ottawa River should start to peak in some areas west of Ottawa-Gatineau on Tuesday, according to the Ottawa River Regulation Planning Board, which measures its water levels. Some communities along the Ottawa River are already seeing waters higher than they saw in the 2017 flood.
 
Flooded streets are seen in Sainte-Marthe-sur-le-Lac, Que. Tuesday. (Paul Chiasson/Canadian Press)
An estimated one million sandbags are standing between the Ottawa River and residences and businesses in Ottawa, and more are in place across the river in Gatineau, Que. But they may not be up to the task of holding back the water, which is expected to rise another 50 centimetres and not peak until later Tuesday or Wednesday. Municipal officials in Ottawa don't expect to be near cleanup mode until the Victoria Day long weekend. Watch aerial footage of the flooded Ottawa River:
CBC News
Drone footage shows Ottawa River flooding
 
CBC News captured aerial footage of the effects of recent flooding in Gatineau, Que. 1:52
Goodale also flagged another source of concern.  "The water level now in Lake Ontario is just to about its maximum normal run off," he said. "All of that obviously has to flow east. Combining with the flow coming down the Ottawa [River], that presents significant potential issues in relation to Montreal and places further downstream."   The weather could also make things difficult for those working to shore up properties against the floodwaters on Wednesday. Ottawa-Gatineau and areas to the west as far as Algonquin Park on the Ontario side of the river are expected to get two to five centimeters of snow, mixed with ice pellets, then 15 to 25 mm of rain. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said on Tuesday these extreme weather events will happen more often, and the government is fighting climate change and investing in climate-resilient infrastructure. The Insurance Bureau of Canada predicts the record flooding will push losses for homeowners from extreme weather to more than $1 billion this year. Finance Minister Bill Morneau said in light of record flooding this spring, the federal government is talking with the provinces about investments in disaster mitigation and prevention efforts. Increasingly, communities are looking at relocating people living in high-risk areas instead of paying year after year to help them rebuild.

Quebec

Some people will be able to return to their homes in Sainte-Marthe-sur-le-Lac, Que., on Tuesday afternoon after floodwaters breached a dike Saturday and forced about 6,000 to flee. The evacuation order will be lifted in certain areas of the town located northwest of Montreal, and Mayor Sonia Paulus said residents from "these areas will need to present identification and receive clearance before returning home." The order won't include a section of Sainte-Marthe that remains submerged. One resident kayaked through her home and shared emotional video:
This video of Valérie Deslauriers kayaking through her flooded home was posted on Facebook.
 
Deslauriers lives in Sainte-Marthe-sur-le-Lac, Que. A natural dike holding back the Lake of Two Mountains was breached this weekend. 0:19
The island of Montreal and Laval remain in states of emergency, a measure giving authorities the power to seize property and force evacuations, while officials in Quebec say the data available suggests the risk of flooding on several rivers across the province remains high. An additional 34 local states of emergency are still in effect around the province.  The province reported over 6,400 flooded homes, a further 3,500 surrounded by water and more than 10,000 evacuees — most of them from Sainte-Marthe-sur-le-Lac.
  • Royal Canadian Navy and Task Force Montreal personnel patrol an area of flooding to look for those in need of help or evacuation in Sainte-Marthe-sur-le-Lac, Que., on April 29, 2019. Thousands of people across Quebec, Ontario and New Brunswick are facing several more days of flooding. (Cplc Julie Turcotte/34th Brigage Group/2nd Canadian Division/Reuters)
New Brunswick
The St. John River from Fredericton to Saint John is still above flooding levels, but emergency officials said the river system is expected to recede to near or below flood stage before the week ends. The entire river basin is steadily declining, according to Greg MacCallum, director of the New Brunswick Emergency Measures Organization (EMO). EMO is now turning its focus to cleanup measures. Residents, however, are warned to avoid contact with floodwater, which can contain sewage and other waste. The Trans-Canada Highway remains closed between Oromocto and River Glade, N.B., but the province's Department of Transportation and Infrastructure said it could reopen this week. This is the second year in a row the major highway has closed due to flooding. Despite the turn in events, strong winds in the forecast remain a concern. New Brunswick power crews have been inspecting downed lines:
CBC News
Chunks of ice have knocked down a series of power poles
 
NB Power linemen, moving between locations on a small boat, were conducting checks on affected buildings and disconnecting power where needed. 1:00
Sajjan visited the Saint John area yesterday to view the activities of military personnel helping in the response effort. He says if the impact of climate change disasters continues to worsen, he may have to increase the number of Canadian Forces personnel available. Goodale said 9,200 residences and cottages have been affected by the flooding in New Brunswick, along with another 7,000 buildings. 

Kashechewan First Nation

First Nations leaders called on the Ontario and federal governments Monday to help relocate the community of Kashechewan as it deals with annual flooding — a problem one said would have already been solved if it involved a non-Indigenous population. Community members rallied on Parliament Hill on Tuesday.
Embedded video
Olivia Stefanovich@CBCOlivia
 

While eastern Canada battles rising flood waters, evacuees of Kashechewan are on Parliament Hill demanding the federal government honours a commitment it made 2 years ago to relocate the northern Ontario First Nation to higher, drier ground @CBCAlerts @CBCNews

The northern Ontario community of 2,500 first flooded in 1976 and has been evacuated annually for the past several years while it waits for the federal government to fulfil its promises to move residents to a permanent new location. "Both levels of government — Ontario and Canada — has allowed this to be normalized," said Nishnawbe Aski Nation Deputy Grand Chief Derek Fox. "I believe personally that if these were non-native, non-First Nations people, action would have happened a lot sooner. I sincerely believe that."
 

Central Ontario cottage country

The mayor of Bracebridge said he's hoping tomorrow's weather forecast doesn't play out as expected. Environment Canada issued a rainfall warning for the swath of central Ontario that's been struggling to cope with flooding in recent days. Mayor Graydon Smith said 25 to 30 mm could fall on Bracebridge tomorrow, with the possibility of a little more rain on Thursday. Smith says an additional 60 military personnel are coming to the region today to help with flood conditions, making a total of 160 soldiers in the area. Four municipalities have declared states of emergency in central Ontario, while further east the Ontario government has activated disaster recovery assistance for the county of Renfrew and the city of Pembroke.
 
A home on Beaumont Farm Road in Bracebridge, Ont., where many homes have been flooded, sinks into the ground after falling from its pilings. (Patrick Morrell/CBC)
With files from The Canadian Press
 
Source: CBC

Ethiopian Airlines crew followed Boeing rules, preliminary crash report says

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Ethiopian Airlines crew followed Boeing rules, preliminary crash report says

18 Canadians among 157 killed when the Boeing 737 Max 8 crashed The Associated Press · Posted: Apr 04, 2019 4:39 AM ET | Last Updated: an hour ago   A man hired to assist forensic investigators looking into the March 10 Ethiopian Airlines crash walks by a pile of twisted airplane debris at Hama.....

A list of the 35 nationalities killed in Ethiopia crash

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A list of the 35 nationalities killed in Ethiopia crash

A list of the 35 nationalities killed in Ethiopia crash This photo was taken Monday, Feb. 11, 2019, shows an Ethiopian Airlines Boeing 737-800 parked at Bole International Airport in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis) The Associated Press  Published Sunday, March 10, 2019, 1:36 PM EDT  ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia - Citizens from 35 countries were.....

18 Canadians among 157 dead after Ethiopian Airlines plane crash near Addis Ababa

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18 Canadians among 157 dead after Ethiopian Airlines plane crash near Addis Ababa

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It was not immediately clear what caused the crash of the Boeing 737-8 MAX plane, which was new and had been delivered to the airline in November

Family members of the victims involved in a plane crash react at Addis Ababa international airport Sunday, March 10, 2019.AP Photo/Mulugeta Ayene
ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia – Eighteen Canadians are among the victims of an Ethiopian Airlines plane crash that killed all 157 people thought to be on board Sunday, the airline’s CEO and Kenya’s transport minister said. The victims also include 32 Kenyans, nine Ethiopians, eight people each from China, the United States and Italy, seven each from France and Britain, six from Egypt, five from the Netherlands and four each from India and Slovakia. It is not yet clear what caused the crash of new Boeing 737-8 MAX plane shortly after takeoff from Bole Airport en route to Kenya’s capital, Nairobi. The pilot sent out a distress call and was given clearance to return, the airline’s CEO said.
Chrystia Freeland @cafreeland
 

Terrible news from , , this morning. My heartfelt condolences to all those who have lost loved ones. The Canadian government is in close contact with Ethiopian authorities to gather additional information as quickly as possible.

219 people are talking about this
 
 
The airline says it will soon conduct forensic investigations to identify the 149 passengers and eight crew who died when a Boeing 737-8 MAX went down shortly after departing from Bole Airport in Ethiopia’s capital Addis Ababa en route to Nairobi, Kenya. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau called the news devastating and said his thoughts are with all the victims and everyone who lost friends, family or loved ones.

STORY CONTINUES BELOW

The plane was one of 30 purchased and being delivered to the rapidly expanding airline. A Boeing statement in July noted the delivery of the first plane. The Ethiopian Airlines CEO says the crashed plane had been delivered in mid-November, 2018. The state-owned Ethiopian Airlines, widely considered the best-managed airline in Africa, calls itself Africa’s largest carrier and has ambitions of becoming the gateway to the continent.
Ethiopian Airlines @flyethiopian
 

Accident Bulletin no. 2 Issued on march 10, 2019 at 01:46 PM

2,773 people are talking about this
 
 
It said 149 passengers and eight crew members were thought to be on the plane that crashed six minutes after departing Addis Ababa on its way to Kenya’s capital. The crash occurred around Bishoftu, or Debre Zeit, some 50 kilometres south of Addis Ababa, at 8:44 a.m. The airline later published a photo that appeared to show its CEO standing in the wreckage. Little of the plane could be seen in the freshly churned earth, under a blue sky. “Tewolde Gebremariam, who is at the accident scene now, regrets to confirm that there are no survivors,” the post on social media said. “He expresses his profound sympathy and condolences to the families and loved ones of passengers and crew who lost their lives in this tragic accident.” The plane had showed unstable vertical speed after takeoff, air traffic monitor Flightradar 24 said in a Twitter post. Visibility was clear. State broadcaster EBC reported all passengers were dead and that they included 33 nationalities. The Ethiopian prime minister’s office offered its “deepest condolences” to families. The Addis Ababa-Nairobi route links East Africa’s two largest economic powers and is popular with tourists making their way to safari and other destinations. Sunburned travellers and tour groups crowd the Addis Ababa airport’s waiting areas, along with businessmen from China and elsewhere. At the airport in Nairobi, worried families gathered. “I came to the airport to receive my brother but I have been told there is a problem,” Agnes Muilu said. “I just pray that he is safe or he was not on it.” “Why are they taking us round and round, it is all over the news that the plane crashed,” said Edwin Ong’undi, who had been waiting for his sister. “All we are asking for is information to know about their fate.” Kenya’s transport minister, James Macharia, said an emergency response had been set up for family and friends. “My prayers go to all the families and associates of those on board,” Kenya’s President Uhuru Kenyatta said. Records show that the plane was new. The Planespotters civil aviation database shows that the Boeing 737-8 MAX was delivered to Ethiopian Airlines in mid-November. In a statement, Boeing said it was “deeply saddened” to hear of the crash and that a technical team was ready to provide assistance at the request of the U.S. National Transportation Safety Board. In October, another Boeing 737-8 MAX plunged into the Java Sea just minutes after taking off from Jakarta, Indonesia’s capital, killing all 189 people on board the plane Lion Air flight. The cockpit data recorder showed that the jet’s airspeed indicator had malfunctioned on its last four flights, though Lion Air initially claimed that problems with the aircraft had been fixed. The last deadly crash of an Ethiopian Airlines passenger plane was in 2010, when the plane crashed minutes after takeoff from Beirut killing all 90 people on board. Sunday’s crash comes as the country’s reformist prime minister, Abiy Ahmed, has vowed to open up the airline and other sectors to foreign investment in a major transformation of the state-centred economy. Ethiopian Airlines has been expanding assertively, recently opening a route to Moscow and in January inaugurating a new passenger terminal in Addis Ababa to triple capacity. Speaking at the inauguration, the prime minister challenged the airline to build a new “Airport City” terminal in Bishoftu _ where Sunday’s crash occurred.

Canada is not China

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Canada is not China

https://youtu.be/zKdqH75mCxo.....

The Prime Minister, Justin Trudeau, today issued the following statement on Christmas:

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The Prime Minister, Justin Trudeau, today issued the following statement on Christmas:

“Merry Christmas, Canada! “Today, our family joins Christians across the country and around the world to celebrate the birth of Christ. “It’s a time to spread joy and cheer, appreciate our blessings, and honour traditions – whether that’s opening presents, decorating the Christmas tree, sharing a meal together, or setting aside a.....

Vote for Saron Gebreselassie in the 2018 mayoral race in Toronto

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Vote for Saron Gebreselassie in the 2018 mayoral race in Toronto

Vote for Saron Gebreselassie in the 2018 mayoral race in Toronto  Admin  2 days ago  Canada, News, Saron Gebreselassie, Toronto By now, it is expected that the candidacy of Saron Gebreselassie in the 2018 mayoral race in Toronto is known to those who follow local and Eritrean social media. This is just a reminder to Toronto residents.....

Chris Selley: Tory wins easily, but Toronto’s mayoral race was a bizarre missed opportunity

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Chris Selley: Tory wins easily, but Toronto's mayoral race was a bizarre missed opportunity

Source: NP

This campaign was supposed to be about whether and how we could do much better, much faster. Instead, it was very nearly a non-event

https://youtu.be/o2zHq4ipX_Q?t=127
Chris Selley Chris Selley October 22, 2018 Goodness knows Toronto has had odd mayoral election campaigns before. John Tory lost one 15 years ago in which the most memorable issue was whether or not to build a bridge across a 150-meter channel between the Island Airport and the mainland. But the campaign Tory won Monday night, with a thumping 63-to-24-per-cent win over former city planner Jennifer Keesmaat, takes the biscuit. In 15 years, people will struggle to explain what on earth this campaign was supposed to be about. The 2003 campaign wasn’t really about the stupid bridge, of course. The bridge stood in for the relatively pragmatic conservative and urbanist liberal worldviews of Tory and eventual winner David Miller, respectively. The MacGuffin this year was “standing up for Toronto.” Keesmaat and the progressives who rallied behind her insisted that’s what Tory failed to do when Premier Doug Ford announced a plan to slash city council in half. Ford went so far as to invoke the notwithstanding clause — which is pretty compelling evidence of how determined he was to get his way. But Keesmaat insisted she would have done … well, something more than Tory. For reasons no one has managed to articulate, Ford would have caved. That was literally the impetus for her campaign. While Keesmaat worked closely with Tory on many of his key accomplishments at City Hall — and indeed endorsed his re-election not so long ago — it was always clear she preferred a more ambitious approach to city-building. It wasn’t until more than a month after her campaign launch, though, that she gave her supporters anything to chew on besides “standing up for Toronto.” She vowed she would tear down the eastern portion of the Gardiner Expressway, which Tory championed rebuilding as unobtrusively as possible. The left didn’t so much rejoice as exhale. Here, finally, was a symbolic issue around which a narrative could form: Tearing it down would express Keesmaat’s forward-thinking agenda of densification, parks, reprioritizing cyclists and pedestrians and transit over the automobile. Keeping it up would express Tory’s penny-pinching small-mindedness. Only that was pretty much all we got. Keesmaat threw in the towel on the other bane of Toronto progressivism, the Scarborough subway. She argued Ford was determined to build it anyway, so Toronto should take its contribution and focus on more useful projects. It was a defensible stance to a point, but her entire campaign was predicated on standing up to Ford, and for Toronto, against terrible decision-making of precisely the sort that is giving us the Scarborough subway.
Mayoral candidate Jennifer Keesmaat speaks after losing to incumbent John Tory on Monday, Oct. 22, 2018. Dave Abel/Postmedia
Most amazingly, but for the $500 million in alleged savings for her Gardiner East teardown and a “property tax surtax” on homes worth more than $4 million, she essentially adopted Tory’s fiscal plan. The mayor’s re-election campaign came in hot after Keesmaat’s surprise entry, accusing her of planning to jack up your taxes. That’s precisely what her core supporters wanted her to do, of course, and in the past she had always argued the city needs more revenue. She countered by pledging to keep property taxes at or below inflation, with no other big revenue play to pay for progressive ambitions. To the NDP campaign machine that scooped Keesmaat up, that no doubt seemed like the safe, professional play. But Keesmaat was never going to win this thing. And she did significantly worse than it was reasonable to expect, not even pulling the 30-per-cent that’s generally thought of as Toronto’s baked-in progressive base. For heaven’s sake, she did almost exactly as well as Olivia Chow did in 2014 in a three-person race! Could she really have done any worse being truer to herself? Speaking of which, congratulations to John Tory. As head of CivicAction, he went around cajoling GTA mayors to support new “revenue tools.” In his first term he supported a special levy on property taxes for his “city-building fund,” raising land transfer taxes and implementing a (no-brainer) hotel tax. Most remarkably, he did what was once considered unthinkable: getting both Queen’s Park and City Council (in a 32-9 vote!) to approve tolling the Gardiner Expressway and Don Valley Parkway.
Toronto mayor John Tory celebrates his re-election victory at the Sheraton Centre Toronto hotel on Monday, Oct 22, 2018. Ernest Doroszuk/Postmedia
Even at a paltry $2 per trip, that would have been an estimated $200-million annual windfall. It could have been far more. Now Tory boasts of the $170 million in gas tax revenue he got from Premier Kathleen Wynne after she reneged under pressure from her doomed 905 caucuses. Fair play to him — and the incident is to Wynne’s enduring shame, not Tory’s — but that’s money Ford could cut off with the stroke of a pen. Tory knows just as well as Keesmaat that the city needs more cash, and needs to raise it itself with tools it already has at its disposal. His attacks on her non-existent plans to do just that leave him no better placed to address roughly $30-billion of the capital projects council have approved but not funded. Toronto could do a whole lot worse than Tory — has done, in fact, very recently and for most of its post-amalgamation history. But with Kesmaat’s entry, this campaign was supposed to be about whether and how we could do much better, much faster. It could and should have been a valuable reality-based democratic exercise. Instead, it was very nearly a non-event.
 

Toronto mayoral candidates go head-to-head in Global News debate

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Toronto mayoral candidates go head-to-head in Global News debate

  Affordable housing, city taxes and public transit were just some of the topics argued by four of the city's mayoral candidates during a debate that was hosted by Global News.
 
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